The combination of attributes that characterize great managers only exist in about one in 10 people, according to new research from Gallup. Another two in 10 working adults have some of the traits to become effective managers with the right coaching and development, the research-based consulting firm said in its The State of the American Manager: Analytics and Advice for Leaders report.Gallup’s study features 40 years of analysis covering 2.5 million manager-led teams in 195 countries, and measures of engagement for 27 million employees.According to Gallup research, the majority of managers are miscast. Just 18 percent of current managers have the high talent required of their role.

Source: 1 in 10 Have Talent to Be Great Manager

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Global jobs aggregator Indeed came close to doubling its net sales revenue for the 12 months ending March 31, growing from $201.3 million U.S.) to $386.8 million (at the current exchange rate).Indeed’s revenue puts it in the same league as CareerBuilder, Monster, LinkedIn, and Dice, all of which reported significantly larger revenue, but much smaller growth rates. From 2013 to 2014, LinkedIn posted the biggest increase among the top job sites, growing recruitment revenue 47.5 percent. Indeed’s growth, disclosed as part of the annual financial report of its owner, Japanese conglomerate Recruit Holdings Co., was 92.2 percent (in U.S. dollars).

Source: Indeed.com’s Owner Wants to Dominate By 2020 – ERE.net

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In today’s global recruiting environment, you must be sensitive to cultural issues and the nuances of translation. Because we here at Roundup want to help further your career, today’s column is a primer on those essentials.Let’s begin. Like Realtors, recruiters have their own language. You probably won’t ever see “purple squirrel” in a help wanted posting, but “detail oriented”? Indeed finds it in 15,000 jobs in California alone.

Source: The Global Recruiter’s Handy Translation Guide – ERE.net

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Subtle motion happens around us all the time, including tiny vibrations caused by sound. New technology shows that we can pick up on these vibrations and actually re-create sound and conversations just from a video of a seemingly still object. But now Abe Davis takes it one step further: Watch him demo software that lets anyone interact with these hidden properties, just from a simple video

See video: http://www.ted.com/talks/abe_davis_new_video_technology_that_reveals_an_object_s_hidden_properties

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THE standard joke about artificial intelligence (AI) is that, like nuclear fusion, it has been the future for more than half a century now. In 1958 the New York Times reported that the “Perceptron”, an early AI machine developed at Cornell University with military money, was “the embryo of an electronic computer that [the American Navy] expects will be able to walk, talk, see, write, reproduce itself and be conscious of its existence.” Five decades later self-aware battleships remain conspicuous by their absence. Yet alongside the hype, there has been spectacular progress: computers are now better than any human at chess, for instance. Computers can process human speech and read even messy handwriting. To cynical moderns, automated telephone-answering systems are infuriating. They would seem like magic to someone from the 1950s. These days AI is in the news again, for there has been impressive progress in the past few years in a particular subfield of AI called machine learning. But what exactly is that?

Source: The Economist explains: How machine learning works | The Economist

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Artificial intelligence is getting smarter by leaps and bounds — within this century, research suggests, a computer AI could be as “smart” as a human being. And then, says Nick Bostrom, it will overtake us: “Machine intelligence is the last invention that humanity will ever need to make.” A philosopher and technologist, Bostrom asks us to think hard about the world we’re building right now, driven by thinking machines. Will our smart machines help to preserve humanity and our values — or will they have values of their own?

Read more: http://www.ted.com/talks/nick_bostrom_what_happens_when_our_computers_get_smarter_than_we_are

 

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