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Posted by Shira Fernaldes Karni on August 22, 2019.
This is the era of knowledge. In today’s world, while knowledge doubles itself approximately every 12 hours, knowledge half-life is rapidly getting shorter and shorter. Evidently, this new reality yields a constant need for learning and refreshing one’s knowledge on a regular basis. In this article, I will elaborate on the risks and challenges organizations face due to the inescapable changes in knowledge. In addition, I will initiate the discussion on how a joint KM-Learning approach can provide organizations with a solution that enables competitive advantage rather than risks mitigation.

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Organizational Risks & Challenges Due to Rapid Changes in Knowledge
While in our daily life we have the freedom to choose which knowledge we consume and to what extent, in an organizational environment it is a completely different story. Often, employees are not up-to-date with the latest regulations, legal requirements, changes of internal processes & procedures, and other business-related pieces of knowledge. This challenge, of uninformed employees and utilization of dated knowledge, can bring organizations to face a high risk of business continuity and unexpected charges.
If that is not enough, the inflation of digital tools and technologies that are constantly facilitating our workplace create confusion and disorientation among employees who are looking for a single focal point and one source of truth, whether for consuming knowledge or for learning. Thus today, it is extremely important that organizations will create solutions and accumulate experiences to make learning and knowledge retrieval almost invisible for their employees’ daily tasks.
Knowledge Management (KM) and Learning: Learning in the Flow of Work
Contemporary knowledge workers are often simply too caught up in their flow of work. Hence, the average employee is able to carve out only about five minutes a day for formal learning.
To overcome these inherent challenges, a new approach takes place: Learning in the flow of work. Under this umbrella, a structured KM-learning approach enables organizations to provide their employees with on-demand and experience-based learning methods for specific situations. Until recently, employees had to address different organizational solutions to fulfill their daily needs: a learning system for learning, a KM solution for business-driven knowledge, and a legacy system in order to perform the operational tasks. Learning in the flow of work that starts and ends via a single focal point can create a seamless digital workplace experience for employees.
We now live in a world where employees’ learning needs are unique, thus, a key part is making the content most relevant for every single user. To create engaged employees, we must provide concise chunks of knowledge. Adding Artificial Intelligence (AI) features/capabilities and context-based personalization can decrease time-to-knowledge, which helps achieve consistent employees’ performance and higher efficiency. Conducting these steps will help ensure the right knowledge to the right person on the right time, as part of day-to-day tasks and activities.
Knowledge management and learning experience platforms, alongside chatbots, are the new digital frontier for learning in the flow of work. However, in this story, technology is only the enabler. Utilizing a structured methodology is necessary. Furthermore, a governance model and processes that align with the organization’s strategy, set the ground for a sustainable framework for the creation, curation & dissemination of knowledge and learning objectives. In addition, defining a robust taxonomy, while contextualizing and restructuring the content, helps ensure easily digested content.
The Future Is Now
The digital workplace is no longer about having as many innovative tools as possible. It is about creating one neat, intelligent, and seamless user experience that achieves the organization’s goals, and answers the employees’ needs. It is recommended that organizations develop solutions that harness existing platforms to create a single focal point for all of the employees’ knowledge & learning needs. AI-based personalized and contextual search, a balanced “push vs. pull” mechanism, and a unified UI-UX to all retrieved content, can do just that. In addition, a conversational learning and knowledge retrieval chatbot on top of primary systems is a straightforward and effective way to pair on-demand learning and business-driven knowledge with daily tasks. The more “intelligent” the chatbot is, the more personalized experience it can provide and higher engagement rates it can achieve.
The future is now. In the 21st century, ongoing transformation of work and the need for people and organizations to constantly upgrade their capabilities and keep a high proficiency level are all known facts. It is the organization’s responsibility to provide employees with the right systems and tools to do so. We now have the capabilities to adjust and build digital solutions that can provide organizations with a competitive advantage within the gig economy. Wisely utilizing these capabilities can constantly keep organizations one step ahead when facing the unavoidable rapid and accelerated knowledge turnover.

Shira Fernaldes Karni s a manager in the Knowledge Management Center of Excellence of Deloitte. She is a leader in the knowledge management and learning joint offering, with extensive experience leading large-scale strategic projects worldwide. Her specialization includes providing professional methodological & technological consulting services to support organizational goals and objectives via digital workplace, KM and learning tools.

1 Bersin, J., (2018), Learning In The Flow Of Work: Arriving Now, retrieved from: https://joshbersin.com/2018/11/learning-in-the-flow-of-work-arriving-now/2 Bersin, J., & Zao-Sanders, M. (2019), Making Learning a Part of Everyday Work, Harvard Business Rearview, retrieved from https://hbr.org/2019/02/making-learning-a-part-of-everyday-work3 Ibid.4 Bersin, J., (2017), The Disruption of Digital Learning: Ten Things We Have Learned, retrieved from https://joshbersin.com/2017/03/the-disruption-of-digital-learning-ten-things-we-have-learned/5Agarwal, D., & Bersin, J., Lahiri, G., Schwartz, J., Volini, E., (2018), From Careers to Experiences: New Pathways, Deloitte, 2018 Global Human Capital Trends, retrieved from https://www2.deloitte.com/insights/us/en/focus/human-capital-trends/2018/building-21st-century-careers.html
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Author: hrtimesblog
Date/time: 23rd August 2019, 15:04

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Part 2: The Leader
Posted by Don Miller and Tiffany McDowell on August 13, 2019.
In “Part 1: The Individual” of our five-part blog series, we explored how individuals united by a common purpose make up the core of an Adaptable Organization. However, these individuals should be empowered and guided by versatile leaders who are able to energize, empower, and connect people across the organization.

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In the Adaptable Organization, leaders exist at all levels and are inclusive orchestrators who foster an environment for high-performing teams.
To be able to transition successfully to the Adaptable Organization, leaders must drive change. Leadership has traditionally been hierarchical and somewhat monolithic; leadership roles have conventionally been given to those considered most expert or experienced. But flattening hierarchy to a distributed, team-based model demands leadership at every level and allows leaders to emerge in the “hidden networks.”
Complexity demands leadership and versatility.
In an adaptive context, three leadership capabilities become paramount: the ability to Energize, Empower, and Connect.
Source: Deloitte Consulting LLP, 2019
Leaders should Energize their people, articulate a compelling vision, instill common goals, and provide belonging. To build and sustain an Adaptable Organization, leaders should be able to galvanize all people, regardless of personality, background, or motivation.
Leaders should Empower others. It is unrealistic to expect a handful of people at the top of an organization to always have the best answers and ideas. Leaders should delegate responsibility and relinquish control to leverage the collective abilities of the entire organization. Encouraging experimentation and continuous learning and instilling a fail-fast mentality in those that they lead should become their role.
The ability of leaders to Connect means encouraging collaboration across boundaries, connecting silos and unlocking potential synergies to support and strengthen networks of teams. It’s important for leaders to be optimistic about the capabilities of others, drive collaboration, be inclusive, and value the contribution of a diverse range of individuals to unlock hidden potential.
Identifying and developing leadership qualities at all levels of the organization drives adaptive potential.
With the shift to purpose-driven teams in an Adaptable Organization, it is critical that talented leaders exist at all levels. Therefore, organizations should focus sharply on developing the ability to Energize, Empower, and Connect in their leaders and leadership pipelines. Identify individuals who are naturally “wired” to lead effectively in this style, and who have the raw material to develop these capabilities in real time—and then invest in initiatives that focus on their development.
How leaders lead is the key factor determining the transition to an Adaptable Organization. Effective leaders must embrace change, navigate ambiguity and complexity, and harness an increasingly diverse workforce.
In this post, we took a deep dive into the type of Leaders who can drive success in the Adaptable Organization. The next post in this series, “Part 3: The Team”, will take a holistic look at ways Individuals and Leaders can come together to form high-performing, adaptable teams.

Don Miller is a managing director in Human Capital Practice of Deloitte Consulting LLP. He serves as the US Analytics leader for Deloitte’s Human Capital Organization Transformation & Talent practice and also serves on Deloitte’s Global Organization Design and Decision Solutions leadership team.
Tiffany McDowell is an Organization Transformation principal in Deloitte Consulting LLP’s Human Capital practice and leads Deloitte’s Organization Strategies Market Offering. She focuses on delivering operating model, organization design, talent strategies, and global change management solutions for large-scale transformation projects.

 
The post The Adaptable Organization Series appeared first on Capital H Blog.
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Author: hrtimesblog
Date/time: 13th August 2019, 21:04

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Posted by Ramona Cheatham, Jeffery Hall and Martin Kamen on August 9, 2019.
Cloud technology enables companies to do business in a new way at faster pace, often with the expectation that it will also yield cost savings and result in a better user experience. But the benefits aren’t automatic: Being smart about implementing cloud means understanding your business challenges and opportunities while managing the cloud and workforce strategy. Deloitte teamed up with Forbes Insights to understand what differentiates the most successful cloud technology implementations from the rest. Here’s what we found.

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To begin our research, we assessed 557 senior leaders about their experiences with recent technology adoptions in cloud technology based on their level of adoption.
Cloud technology enables companies to do business in a new way at faster pace, often with the expectation that it will also yield cost savings and result in a better user experience. But the benefits aren’t automatic: Being smart about implementing cloud means understanding your business challenges and opportunities while managing the cloud and workforce strategy. Deloitte teamed up with Forbes Insights to understand what differentiates the most successful cloud technology implementations from the rest. Here’s what we found.
To begin our research, we assessed 557 senior leaders about their experiences with recent technology adoptions in cloud technology based on their level of adoption.
Source: Deloitte Consulting LLP
 
Going all-in yielded improved results…
Our research found a link between high adoption and benefits realization. Organizations that were 100 percent cloud were more likely to see benefits than those relying on a mixed stack. On average, 63 percent of organizations that fully adopted cloud benefited from:
Being able to change their infrastructure rapidly
Improved internal end-user experience—those who use the system can see the difference in the way the system processes the work
Faster processing speed
Improved customer experience
Organizations that adopted the mixed stacks only produced success in these areas an average of 33 percent of the time.
…But overall, ROI and cost savings didn’t meet expectations
Not surprisingly, the first question most executives ask about cloud technology is, “What’s it worth to me?” The surface impacts are immediate, such as freeing up employees who would normally focus on day-to-day activities to be able to focus on higher-value strategy and services that can potentially result in increased revenue. Organizations also benefit from a reduction in technology infrastructure capital expense that could possibly provide some relief in other aspects of the business, such as tax depreciation savings.
However, when we analyzed the value of cloud solutions by comparing highly mature cloud organizations and all other cloud respondents, we found that cloud did not meet the expected ROI outcomes in 47 percent of the organizations with a consistent stack and about 70 percent of those with a mixed stack. Organizations capitalized more of the cloud investment, and overall cost was not lowered.
This begs the question: Were expectations set too high from the start? It is possible that this misconception can be attributed to overestimating ROI relative to previous tech implementations.
The research did conclude that cloud solutions appear to provide technology companies with better data for their business cases, in that using cloud solutions made it possible to more accurately predict implementation costs vs. non-cloud solutions. Sixty-five (65) percent of companies using cloud services were able to accurately predict implementation costs vs 55 percent of companies using non-cloud solutions.
Cloud improves end-user experience…more so for all-in adopters
Cloud improves the internal end-user experience by increasing top-end processing speed and decreasing complexity. Internal service levels are improved, as is the customer experience, all while creating the flexibility to make changes to the infrastructure faster and more easily.
Organizations that moved their entire technology stack to the cloud reported significant benefits compared to mixed-stack companies. Overall, companies who committed fully to a cloud stack realized significant improvements in top-end processing speed, even relative to companies with a 75 percent cloud stack. Let’s also think about the impacts to the workforce in general.
The workforce journey to cloud…. equally important to successful implementation
Organizations are not only experiencing an IT transformation but a workforce transformation as well. Cloud strategy and workforce strategy go hand in hand. What does the future of work look like for the organization after the implementation? How is the workforce going to change? What new skills and capabilities exist or will be required? These are some of the questions that should be asked. Organizations must ensure that a workforce plan is implemented not only as part of the IT organization but also outside as well. Investment in the workforce should be included in the bottom line.
Bottom Line: Be realistic about ROI and prepare to go all-in
When companies create business cases for cloud transformations, they need to acknowledge the implementation costs, investment in a cloud-enabled workforce, ongoing cloud services, as well as maintenance fees to fully understand both the costs and potential ROI. (See this post for a deeper dive into cloud sustainability in relation to SaaS.)
Cloud delivers significant value in terms of processing speed, speed to market, and end-user and customer experience when organizations are fully cloud based. So, organizations looking to enable faster changes and more adaptable business processes should consider a full move to the cloud.
By managing ROI expectations going into the implementation and getting stakeholders to agree that end-user experience and infrastructure benefits outweigh pure ROI, the result is a “smart” successful cloud implementation.

Ramona Cheatham is a senior consultant in Deloitte Consulting LLP’s Human Capital practice, specializing in organizational transformation with a focus on change management for technology-enabled transformations. 
Jeffery Hall is a specialist leader in Deloitte Consulting LLP’s Digital & Cloud Enablement practice, advising and managing client business transformations driven by digital innovation.
Martin Kamen is a principal in Deloitte Consulting LLP’s Human Capital practice. Martin’s focus is on working with technology clients to help them manage and prepare leaders and employees for large-scale business transformation.

 
The post Being smart about cloud adoption: What to know, what to do appeared first on Capital H Blog.
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Author: hrtimesblog
Date/time: 10th August 2019, 03:04

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How ready are you to take advantage of them?
Posted by Bhawna Bist and Alice Jun on July 2, 2019.
Cognitive and AI technologies are increasingly pervasive in the world of talent acquisition (TA), in the news, in the minds of leaders, and among solution providers. How ready is your organization to implement them in a way that can be truly transformational?

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More and more we are seeing organizations augment their applicant tracking system (ATS) with AI technologies to enhance recruiting efficiency and effectiveness—for example, AI-enabled web crawling for sourcing; chatbots for screening; machine learning for candidate ranking and fit. The operating model is being adjusted for the AI technologies being adopted, and the role profile of the recruiter is changing to accommodate these technologies.
Assessing your organization’s readiness to adopt these technologies is a crucial first step, as discrepancies in readiness can create issues. For example, if an organization is financially ready to adopt a cognitive tool, but its recruiters are not ready to use them, the true value of the investment will not be realized. Assessing readiness before jumping in helps assure alignment within the organization in how the tools are used, prevents unforeseen roadblocks, and lays the foundation for long-term success.
Readiness can be determined by factors such as business need, infrastructure, leadership buy-in, budget availability, technical skills, and governance. Depending on these parameters, you may be at any one of three levels of readiness: foundational (low), operational (medium), or transformational (high). Understanding the nuances in the requirements and competencies within these readiness levels will support the organization’s ability to implement and use AI technologies effectively.
All TA organizations start on the same foot with low levels of readiness, but should strive and take necessary steps to reach a high level of readiness, where AI technologies can be transformational for the TA function. The levels are cumulative: the highest (transformational) level has all the characteristics of the two lower levels.
At what level is your organization’s readiness?
Foundational (Low): You are interested in the use of AI and have a budget to spend, but have not connected this well to your overall TA Strategy.
Key characteristics:
A clear business need: This could be evidenced by too much time spent on repetitive, administrative or transactional tasks, a need to enhance the candidate experience at higher volumes or limited work incorporating AI technologies into the TA operating model. AI technologies can free up recruiters’ time so they can be more strategic in their role, and deliver a consistent candidate experience.
Basic infrastructure: Core recruiting data is in place (job aids, job descriptions, position management, maybe even a workforce plan) and representative pools of candidate data are available.
Resources: Basic TA leadership buy-in has been secured in the form of funding availability. Budget may be low, but it is clear, with an outline of both hard costs (such as purchase price) and soft (such as efficiencies gained and higher quality of hires).
Operational (Medium): You understand AI and have invested time to understand this market. You are driving results in candidate flow but are struggling to tie to this to business outcomes.
Key characteristics:
Effective delivery capability: Ability to gather requirements, maintain databases, and build and test continuously. This is critical because AI solutions are not a one-and-done solution but an evolving solution that gets better with more data, time, and corrections.
Technical skills: Availability of solutions architects with both AI know-how and knowledge of the TA organization, as well as an internal IT function that can support the implementation team.
Governance: Ability to evaluate the risks of AI solutions and minimize potential negative impacts to candidates and the business, but business impact is not fully understood.
Transformational (High): You are invested in the use of AI as the system of engagement with your candidates and understand how this is driving business value that was not available previously.
Key characteristics:
Broad and aligned leadership buy-in: TA, HR, and organizational leaders see AI technologies as strategically integral to the organization’s ability to compete in the talent market and consider it an opportunity for growth.
Optimization: TA realizes the value and reaps the benefits of the AI solutions that are implemented. For example, the candidate experience is woven together with the technologies and supports the employer value proposition.
Business acceptance: From TA leaders to sourcers to hiring managers, the AI solution is accepted and being used in daily recruiting activities to drive outcomes.
Readiness drives value
Readiness for AI is not the same as being able to benefit from AI—every organization can potentially benefit from AI. Immature and highly transactional TA functions may benefit the most because of the efficiency gains AI makes possible, but even mature, optimized TA functions can still realize greater efficiencies. The level of readiness for AI does, however, impact short- and long-term value. Organizations at the highest, transformational, level of readiness are positioned to realize the greatest value.

Bhawna Bist is a senior manager in the Workforce Transformation practice of Deloitte Consulting LLP, specializing in HR & Talent Acquisition Transformation. She has more than 16 years of cross-industry and consulting experience advising global organizations and leads the development of the firm’s point of view around AI in TA.
Alice Jun is a consultant in the Workforce Transformation practice of Deloitte Consulting LLP. Alice has focused on Talent Acquisition Transformation and supports the development of the firm’s perspective on AI technologies.

The post Cognitive and AI technologies are transforming talent acquisition appeared first on Capital H Blog.
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Author: hrtimesblog
Date/time: 3rd July 2019, 00:03

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Posted by Tom Joseph, Kyle Forrest, and Blair Moldoff on June 28, 2019.
It’s Wednesday morning. Harry, an HR Business Partner at a large corporation, has just returned from a business unit leadership meeting. Competition is continuing to grow, uncertainty in the markets is increasing, and leadership has decided that an acquisition is needed. Facing this critical business move, Harry thinks about HR’s previous role in the company’s M&A deals, which hasn’t been particularly robust, mostly weighing in on compensation and benefits. He knows HR can play a more strategic role.

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Harry’s right—HR can and should play a pivotal role in helping the organization realize value from M&A activity.
Business and HR leaders continue to face massive disruption across industries, sectors, and within the workforce, and now more than ever many leaders are struggling to create a plan to determine the future of their business and navigate each disruption successfully.
While facing disruption is becoming the norm for organizations, disruption is magnified during a merger, acquisition, or divestiture. With the enormous change and additional work that an M&A transaction brings to a company and the HR function, it is often daunting to plan for months into the future, let alone years. As a result, topics such as the Future of Work are often pushed down the road, in the hope that future trends will be addressed once the new company has stabilized.
Unfortunately, this approach fails to recognize how M&A activity can be a key enabler of the shift to the future. HR M&A groups can capture momentum by bringing the right Focus to a transaction; building a fit-for-purpose Lens through which HR delivers services; developing a Mindset that the workforce understands and is bought into; and providing the right set of Enablers to support the workforce. And their involvement can carry through each critical phase of the deal, from the run-up to Day 1 to post-close integration.
Strategy/Target Screening
The initial strategy and target screening phases of M&A work are generally the least structured, and often don’t involve HR leaders at all. Potential acquisitions or divestitures are explored through potential revenue or cost synergies, or even a casual CEO conversation.
HR functions are already working to be more agile, operate more strategically, and better provide valuable insights to the business—a true high-impact operating model. This applies in potential M&A environments as well. By adjusting the lens in which they view M&A, HR leaders can actively insert themselves into those conversations, enabling smoother transactions and voicing alternative perspectives in the C-suite.
By forming agile M&A “tiger teams” composed of a diverse group of experienced, motivated personnel interested in tackling business initiatives, HR can provide strategic input to and integrate thoroughly with the business. This will shape a culture of trust, inclusion, and accountability within leadership so that HR can be viewed as an essential voice in the screening process, rather than a compliance and control group to pull in post-announcement.
Due Diligence
During diligence, traditional areas of focus within the HR function are tangible financial assets such as pensions, benefits, and overall headcount. By looking at simple dollar values of this limited scope, HR leaders can miss the bigger picture of how a target can jumpstart a transformation through enablers that are currently in use.
In the Future of HR, organizations should focus on a unified engagement platform centered on productivity: HR technology must be engaging, accessible, automated, and adaptable. By highlighting the target’s use of automated process, cognitive solutions, and social platforms, leaders can uncover additional deal value and incorporate the knowledge of the target’s technology landscape into planning for which technology solutions to integrate for Day 1 and beyond.
Transaction Execution
In an increasingly digital environment, it is essential for any company to shift from simply “doing digital” activities to truly “being” a digital organization. The future of enterprise is distinctly tied to certain traits and behaviors, or Digital DNA, that digitally-native companies inherently possess.
For HR leaders to inorganically embed these traits in a company can seem daunting, but even the most static and traditional organizations often take on many of these characteristics during an M&A transaction. Concepts such as agility, intentional collaboration, and constant disruption are all inherent in an M&A environment.
HR should take advantage of this unique opportunity and help instill a digital mindset that remains after Day 1. Encouraging behaviors that support collaboration and agility outside of M&A related activities will shift the enterprise toward more sustainable future state.
Post-close Integration/Divestiture
After the transaction closes, there is often a sigh of relief, shortly followed by the realization that now the real work has to begin. To quickly capture the value as two organizations merge together (or a new entity is officially separate from its previous parent company), there should be a renewed focus on workforce experience and satisfaction.
If new employees are not actively engaged and satisfied with their work, productivity often slips, leaving unrealized value even as business models are combined and optimized. As such, HR should listen to employees—understand what went well during the transaction, what components of their organization they love, and what they wouldn’t mind parting with.
Further, HR should empathize and co-create with the workforce as the new organization develops. Rather than changes happening “to” them, workers should feel the transformation of the company is “by” them. By highlighting that leaders and the rest of the organization are collaborating to drive the future of the company together, the business can win buy-in from employees and increase productivity gains.
Taking the lead
Now more than ever, HR is being asked to take the lead on behalf of the enterprise in making shifts and changes to thrive amid constant disruption. M&A environments can provide an ideal opportunity to do so.
Back in his office, Harry thinks about the upcoming acquisition. He sees the potential to use it to not only elevate HR’s role in the business but also shift the business itself toward a more fluid, agile way of working. Excited by the possibilities, he starts mapping out his ideas to share with his BU VP.

Tom Joseph is a principal in Deloitte Consulting LLP and has more than 18 years of M&A consulting experience. He works closely to plan integration strategies, plan for an issue-free “Day 1,” manage enterprise-wide organization readiness, and design the cross-functional integration program.
Kyle Forrest is a senior manager in Deloitte Consulting LLP and has over 11 years of HR and M&A consulting experience. He works across the M&A deal life cycle, partnering with clients on integration/divestiture strategy and execution and how to help HR organizations prepare for and scale for growth.
Blair Moldoff is a senior manager at Deloitte Consulting LLP and has over 12 years of experience in global Human Capital consulting and people management, successfully advising and leading clients through complex global HR Transformations with process, service delivery, and technology components.

The post Using M&A to reach the Future of HR appeared first on Capital H Blog.
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Author: hrtimesblog
Date/time: 29th June 2019, 00:03

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